Tag Archives: veg patch

Bad blogger… bad bad blogger…

I am so sorry to my loyal readers… I have been having a fortnight from hell and I have not been able to get onto my computer to crank out a blog post.  I do apologise… however, there are good reasons for the lack of communication.

gardening fun

First of all, it is the time of year when there needs to be a lot of work done in the garden.  This year, being our second growing season in this garden, we have more work to do than usual!  I have been planting up a storm since January and I am now taking care of the baby plants the best way I can.  There are some which are already out in our little lean to green house, hardening off before they get put out into the soil, and then there are the ones I am trying to germinate.  They are currently in the conservatory, and they seem to be doing okay in there, soaking up whatever sun there is!

veg patch

We have taken out an old box hedge, we have painted the shed and the big greenhouse, we have taken possession of the big greenhouse and are planning what we are going to grow in it and we have begun to dig what will be the vegetable patch.  We have raised beds to paint, we have dwarf fruit trees to plant, we have strawberries to revive and plant, we have raspberries and other soft fruit to fertilise and weed around.  We have a compost heap to sort out as well and the flower beds all need weeding and getting sorted for the annuals and bulbs to show off later on.

frazzled owl

Are you tired yet?!

Well, add into the mix of this,  that the Adoption is beginning to get tricky as well.  Not with the actual process… that is meandering about the way it does.  But my patience is wearing very thin indeed.  I needed to think very carefully about whether I wanted to continue with the process and what was I going to do if it didn’t work.  Although everyone thinks that there is always a payoff of a baby when you go through the Adoption process, the facts are somewhat different and it is in no way guaranteed.  Our process has already been so long and so difficult (and out of the ordinary – of course… I never do anything the easy or the ordinary way!) I am not sure how much more I am going to be able to take.  It has been quite stressful and difficult as I am sure you can all imagine.  There wasn’t much other head space for anything else, let alone sorting out blog posts.

All I can promise is that I will try and do better after Easter.  I will even try and sort out some blog themes and interesting things to post about… and I need to get back to my studying.  I haven’t done any lessons for weeks.

Happy Easter

Happy Easter to everyone, and see you on the other side!

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Biodynamic Gardening and the effect of the solar eclipse

First, I must apologise for silence this week.  It has been hugely busy all week, and the days I would usually write a blog have been taken up with dealing with gas men quoting for boilers, delivering Easter treats to Godchildren and then trying to catch up on the chores which have been left alone while doing the other things.  This madness is not going to let up over the weekend, but I thought while I wait for the next gas man to arrive, I would write a blog post.

eclipse

As I am in the Northern Hemisphere and in Europe, as I type, we are in the process of experiencing a solar eclipse.  The last time there was such a visible spectacle was in 1999, and I remember being part of the awed crowds watching the process (through appropriate methods to safeguard the eyes, of course).  As far as I can tell, if you have seen one eclipse, you have seen them all, so I am not that concerned about the whole process (though it is interesting watching the birds and the squirrels in the garden – they are very confused indeed!) but one thing that did get the old grey cells exercising was whether the solar eclipse would effect biodynamic gardening methods.

veg patch

You may not know about biodynamic gardening, but it is a subject that is really peaking my interest at the moment.  I am not sure if I am going to pursue it, but I want to know more, and so I have been doing a bit of digging around on the internet.   I found a really interesting article in the Daily Telegraph (interestingly, printed on my birthday in 2009) which detailed the writer’s experience with biodynamic agriculture.  It was an enlightening read (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/6202917/Why-biodynamic-gardening-makes-sense.html) .

This form of gardening was promulgated in 1924 by Austrian Rudolf Steiner, and is effectively a process to deepen our understanding of the life forces that underlie nature’s processes in order to produce food of the highest quality.  I can’t help thinking that it is gardening on the same basis that healing using herbalism is for medicine.  Supporting the life force in order to get the best result.  I guess that might make me sound supremely “crunchy” but it makes sense to me.

lunar planting

Most people are aware of the organic principles of natural sustainability and not using any chemicals.  Biodynamics requires a very strong basis of organic husbandry combined with a few practices that “normal” gardeners might find to be a bit odd, including planting according to a lunar calendar, preparation of the soil in particular ways and clearly,  very open mind!

I recall that the Royal Horticultural Society did some field trials using chemical, organic and biodynamic methods and the results were quite remarkable.  Biodynamic planting, according to the lunar calendar, really made a difference to the health of the plants and the yield they produced.  Something definitely works then even if we aren’t sure what.

What about the solar eclipse?  If the moon moving through various constellations has such an impact, what about the moon moving across the sun, obliterating it from sight?  From my research it is considered sensible to leave all gardening alone for a while – though to be honest, a lot of the sites I found were less than fullsome in their explanations.

biodynamic books

I think that I need to do a good deal of research into the methods of biodynamic horticulture before I decide whether to make my vegetable and herb patch a biodynamic experiment.

Mind you, if I could find a method of biodynamic pest control which meant that slug and squirrels went elsewhere for their snacks, I would be on it like a flash!    I would also be more than happy to be called “loony”.